Water Conservation and Recycling

About 12 million people have been affected in Europe by floods or droughts over the past decade, split about evenly between the two.
Source
Half of Europe’s alpine glaciers could disappear by 2025.
Source
In 2003, extreme warm and dry weather conditions caused an average decrease in glaciers thickness in the Alps of about 3 metres water equivalent, nearly twice as much as during the previous record year, 1998, and roughly 5 times more than the average loss recorded during the exceptionally warm period of 1980-2000.
Source
In the Russian Federation, 1,400 areas with polluted groundwater have been identified, 82% of them are west of the Urals mountains.
Source
Water demand across Europe has steadily increased over the past 50 years, partly due to population growth. This has led to an overall decrease in renewable water resources per capita by 24 % across Europe.
Source
In the summer of 2015, renewable freshwater resources (such as groundwater, lakes, rivers or reservoirs) were 20 % less than in the same period in 2014 because of a 10 % net drop in precipitation.
Source
The EEA estimates that around one third of the EU territory is exposed to water stress conditions, either permanently or temporarily.
Source
Agricultural areas with intensive irrigation, islands in southern Europe popular with tourists and large urban agglomerations are deemed to be the biggest water stress hotspots.
Source
Improvements in water efficiency and management of water supplies have resulted in an overall decrease in total water abstraction of 19 % since 1990.
Source
Economic activities in Europe use on average around 243 000 cubic hectometres of water annually according to the EEA’s water exploitation index. Although most of this water (over 140 000 cubic hectometres) is returned to the environment, it often contains impurities or pollutants, including hazardous chemicals.
Source
Agriculture accounts for the largest use of water: around 40 % of the total water used per year in Europe.
Source
Over the past thirty years, droughts have dramatically increased in number and intensity in the EU and at least 11% of the European population and 17% of its territory have been affected by water scarcity to date.
Source
Over the past thirty years, droughts have dramatically increased in number and intensity in the EU and at least 11% of the European population and 17% of its territory have been affected by water scarcity to date.
Source
UN Sustainable Development Goal on Water (SDG 6) specifically targets a substantial increase in recycling and safe reuse globally by 2030.
Source
Water reuse is a top priority area in the Strategic Implementation Plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Water, and maximisation of water reuse is a specific objective in the Communication “Blueprint to safeguard Europe’s water resources”
Source
At present, about 1 billion cubic metres of treated urban wastewater is reused annually, which accounts for approximately 2.4% of the treated urban wastewater effluents and less than 0.5% of annual EU freshwater withdrawals. But the EU potential is much higher, estimated in the order of 6 billion cubic metres – six times the current volume.
Source
Cyprus and Malta already reuse more than 90% and 60% of their wastewater respectively, while Greece, Italy and Spain reuse between 5 and 12% of their effluents, clearly indicating a huge potential for further uptake.
Source

Comments are closed.