Water Conservation and Recycling

Every day in the United States, we drink about 110 million gallons of water.
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Landscaping accounts for about half the water Californians use at home. Showers account for another 18 percent, while toilets use about 20 percent.
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The average American uses 140-170 gallons of water per day.
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If every household in America had a faucet that dripped once each second, 928 million gallons of water a day would leak away.
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According to recent reports, nearly 5% of all U.S. water withdrawals are used to fuel industry and the production of many of the material goods we stock up on weekly, monthly, and yearly.
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It takes about 100 gallons of water to grow and process a single pound of cotton, and the average American goes through about 35 pounds of new cotton material each year.
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Landscaping accounts for about half the water Californians use at home.
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Water withdrawals in four States — California, Texas, Idaho, and Florida — accounted for more than one-fourth of all fresh and saline water withdrawn in the United States in 2005.
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Irrigation accounted for 85 percent of the 19,500 Mgal/d of water withdrawn in Idaho, and thermoelectric power accounted for 66 percent of the 18,300 Mgal/d withdrawn in Florida.
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More than half (53 percent) of the total withdrawals of 45,700 Mgal/d in California were for irrigation, and 28 percent were for thermoelectric power.
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From 2003-2005, the average water use for golf course irrigation in the U.S. was estimated to be 2,312,701 acrefeet per year. That equates to approximately 2.08 billion gallons of water per day for golf course irrigation in the U.S.
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The average American uses 100 gallons of water per day or 320 gallons used every day by the average family.
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Of the estimated 29 billion gallons of water used daily by households in the United States, more than 8.5 billion, or 30 percent, is devoted to outdoor water use.
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It is estimated that the average American home consumes 58,000 gallons of water outdoors each year, mostly for irrigation.
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The Las Vegas Strip accounts for just three percent of local water use, but 70 percent of the city’s water supply goes toward irrigating the 60-plus golf courses and the many residential lawns in the area.
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Currently, the United States treats 70 percent of its wastewater, but only uses 4 percent of that amount.
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The U.S. had the world’s highest per capita water footprint, at 2,842 cubic meters per annum.
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“A 2012 National Academy of Sciences study found that U.S. coastal cities could increase their water supply 27 percent with treated wastewater.”
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It is estimated that reuse of all the wastewater we discharge to the oceans and estuaries would increase the water available to U.S. municipalities by about 6 percent.
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1 billion gallons per day of treated wastewater is reclaimed to meet non-potable water needs (in the U.S.).
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Florida is a national leader in water reuse. Approximately 719 million gallons per day of reclaimed water was reused for beneficial purposes in 2013.
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“In 2010, California recycled roughly 650,000 acre-feet of water per year (ac-ft/yr). They have set ambitious goals to increase water recycling, with at least 1 million ac-ft/yr recycled by 2020, and 2 million ac-ft/yr by 2030.”
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“Less than three-tenths of 1 percent of total water use across the United States involves recycling.”
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