Facts and Statistics - Israel

Israel recycles 80 percent of its sewage, using much of it for irrigation.
Source
The current cumulative deficit in Israel’s renewable water resources amounts to approximately 2 billion cubic meters, an amount equal to the annual consumption of the State.
Source
Israel has suffered from four consecutive years of drought.
Source
The total average annual potential of renewable water amounts to some 1,800 MCM, of which about 95% is already exploited and used for domestic consumption and irrigation. About 80% of the water potential is in the north of the country and only 20% in the south.
Source
In agriculture, the wide scale adoption of low volume irrigation systems (e.g. drip, micro-sprinklers) and automation has increased the average efficiency to 90% as compared to 64% for furrow irrigation. As a result, the average requirement of water per unit of land area has decreased from 8,700 cum/ha in 1975 to the current application rate of 5,500 cum/ha. At the same time agricultural output has increased twelve fold, while total water consumption by the sector has remained almost constant.
Source
Although Israel is nearly two-thirds desert, the country has enough water to sustain itself, thanks to its efforts in water conservation, reuse, and desalination.
Source
In the past decade, Israel has opened five major desalination plants. Together, they will produce a total of more than 130 billion gallons of potable water a year, with a goal of 200 billion gallons by 2020.
Source
The water treated for reuse in Israel is predominantly used for agricultural irrigation. Roughly 10 percent is used for environmental purposes, such as increasing river flow volume, and for fire suppression. Only 5 percent is discharged into the sea.
Source
Israel exports $2.2 billion annually in water technology and expertise.
Source
About 92% of Israeli wastewater gets treated and 75% is used for agricultural irrigation. Israel plans to recycle 95% of its wastewater for irrigation by the end of 2025.
Source
In June 2015, the Israeli Ministry of Economy committed $500,000 to the World Bank Group’s Water Global Practice to help developing countries overcome complex water security challenges.
Source

Comments are closed.