Facts and Statistics

The Sahara is stealthily expanding southward by about 48 square kilometres a year.
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Sub-Saharan Africa is the slowest of the world’s regions in achieving improved sanitation: only 31 percent of residents had access to improved sanitation in 2006.
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Economic losses due to the lack of water and sanitation in Africa as a result of the mortality and morbidity impacts is estimated at $28.4 billion or about 5% of GDP.
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Annual rain in South Africa
Annual rain in South Africa
Nitrate* is the most common chemical contaminant in the world’s groundwater aquifers. (Spalding and Exner, 1993) And mean nitrate levels have risen by an estimated 36% in global waterways since 1990 with the most dramatic increases seen in the Eastern Mediterranean and Africa, where nitrate contamination has more than doubled.
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According to various surveys in India and Africa, 20-50% of wells contain nitrate1 levels greater than 50mg/1 and in some cases as high as several hundred milligrams per liter.
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In African children under the age of five, 85% of all diseases contracted are caused by a lack of clean drinking water.
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Of all the people in the world still relying on surface water instead of groundwater, two-thirds of these 159 million people live in Africa.
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There are 319 million people living in Africa who don’t have regular access to sustainable clean drinking water.
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695 million people in Africa live without clean sanitation options.
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42% of all the healthcare facilities and hospitals in Africa don’t have clean drinking water in the vicinity.
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Although over 80% of the people living in Africa without clean water rely on agriculture as a sole means of survival, these agricultural practices further damage the water supply significantly.
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2.2 million deaths a year occur because of severe diarrhea caused by unclean drinking water.
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Only 16% of people living in sub-Saharan Africa have access to water through dedicated taps available in their homes or yards.
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As recently as 2001, cholera was a huge problem in South Africa.
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In 2001, over ten thousand people became sick with cholera in South Africa.
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